Coronavirus Latest Updates

  • Printer Friendly Version
  • Decrease Text Size
  • Increase Text Size
  • PDF
A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z


Ovarian, Fallopian, and Primary Peritoneal

Ovarian, Fallopian, and Primary Peritoneal


Ovarian, Fallopian, and Primary Peritoneal

Gynecologic oncologists at Westchester Medical Center provide and coordinate care for women diagnosed with ovarian, Fallopian, and primary peritoneal cancer. We treat patients who come from a wide area – oftentimes as far as two hours or more from the east, north and west.

We work very closely with our patients in coordinating care. While your WMCHealth physician may refer you to a medical or radiation oncologist closer to your own home, we continue to remain actively involved in managing your care. The WMCHealth Network has many satellite offices throughout the Hudson Valley to serve patients.

hough ovarian, fallopian and primary peritoneal cancers are rare in young adults, we provide additional resources to women between the ages of 15 and 39 through our Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program. Learn more.

Call 914.493.2181 to Request an Appointment or Make a Referral

Ovarian Cancer and Fallopian Tube Cancer

The seventh most common cancer among women, ovarian cancer may present symptoms such as bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, difficulty eating (or feeling full without eating much), or urinary problems, such as frequency or urgency.

  • Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most common form of ovarian cancer, accounting for 85 to 89 percent of all cases. These cancerous cells form on the surface of the ovary or in the Fallopian tubes.
  • Familial breast-ovarian cancer syndrome is a genetic condition that causes 15 to 20 percent of ovarian cancers. All women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer are recommended to undergo genetic testing for the BRCA mutation.
  • Germ cell cancers and stroma cell cancer are two rare forms of ovarian cancer also treated at Westchester Medical Center.
  • Fallopian tube cancer is similar to epithelial ovarian cancer in regard to symptoms and treatment. Your gynecologic oncologist at Westchester Medical Center will work with you to plan the targeted therapies required for best treating your ovarian cancer.

Your gynecologic oncologist at Westchester Medical Center will work with you to plan the targeted therapies required for best treating your ovarian cancer.

Primary Peritoneal Cancer

A relatively rare cancer, primary peritoneal cancer can develop in both men and women (though it is primarily diagnosed in women). It can occur even if a woman has had her ovaries removed. This cancer affects the peritoneum, the smooth tissue that surrounds the abdominal organs. The peritoneum provides protection and allows the abdominal organs to move within the abdominal cavity with ease. Primary peritoneal cancer can have a clinical presentation very similar to ovarian cancer and Fallopian tube cancer.

Treatment Options Focused On You

While every treatment plan is custom-tailored for the patient’s individual needs, two fairly common treatment plans are: surgery followed by chemotherapy and chemotherapy followed by surgery. Your gynecologic oncologist may use either intravenous chemotherapy or intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy.

  • Intravenous chemotherapy: medication is injected into the veins, potentially reaching cancerous cells that have spread outside of the primary target area.
  • Intraperitoneal chemotherapy: medication is injected directly into the abdominal cavity. Some of the drugs may also be injected intravenously in conjunction with those administered via abdominal catheter.

Oncologists at Westchester Medical Center’s Division of Gynecologic Oncology offer numerous therapies for treating ovarian and other gynecological cancers, including both traditional and minimally invasive state-of-the-art laparoscopic surgery, intravenous and intraperitoneal chemotherapies, immunotherapy, biologic targeted therapies, hormone and radiation treatments, and reconstructive surgery following treatment.