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Psychiatry Residency Program

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Message from Program Director

How do you train a psychiatrist?

Should a residency program be focused on producing can-do clinicians, whose training and experience prepares them to work with unpredictable patients and ever-changing diagnostic assessments? Or does the ideal residency produce young scientists, who contribute to the academic community through meeting attendance and literature, and incorporate current scientific research into daily practice?

If we place clinical practice as our paramount goal, then do we mean psychopharmacology, cognitive behavior therapy, family therapy, group psychotherapy - or any of the hundred permutations of these techniques? If, on the other hand, we place science first, then what kind of science: genomics, biomolecular neuroscience, fMRI imaging of neural networks, bundled and unbundled comparisons of DBT against alternative manualized psychotherapies, longitudinal studies of defense mechanisms?

Yet, perhaps there's something beyond science and clinical practice that is the defining factor in the training of a psychiatrist: a tradition of disciplined humanistic thought and practice that begins with Charcot and extends through the greats of the 19th and early 20th centuries: Freud, Kreapelin, Bleuler, Jaspers, to name a few giants of independent thought who defined the problems we still engage today. Surely any training program that does not place its graduates in this procession is incomplete?

And yet, isn't there something more to the making of a psychiatrist than clinical, scientific and intellectual development? Isn't it the case that psychiatrists - unique among physicians - face a special challenge to both understand mental illness, to establish intimate relationships with their patients, and to simultaneously maintain a professional and intellectual position of independence from them? Isn't it the case that almost every psychiatrist must - to one extent or another - inevitably confront themselves, and develop personally and morally, if they are to find their way in what some have called "the impossible profession?"

The answer to each of these questions, as surely you surmise, is "yes." Modern psychiatric training is deficient if it does not include awareness of all of these domains of knowledge, and likely many others I've failed to mention.

The problem of integrating diverse data and theoretical concepts, represents one more aspect of the challenge psychiatrists face on a daily basis - and one of the reasons psychiatry remains the most fascinating branch of medicine.

The goal of our training program is to begin a process of lifelong learning. In addition to our four-year adult psychiatric residency training program, we also have fellowships in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine. Our yearlong Outpatient Department (OPD) rotation includes training in a broad range of psychotherapies. Psychoanalytic courses taken by residents trained in either adult or child may be integrated into a separate advanced psychoanalytic training program or a selective during the PGY4 year. We are building our curriculum in biological psychiatry and psychopharmacology, and building a department-wide commitment to education and research.

Under the leadership of Dr. Stephen Ferrando, our Chairman, we are committed to the mentorship of our residents as leaders, scholars and clinicians. We welcome your interest in our program, and hope that you will consider building the next stage of your career with us.  

Sincerely,

 

Alexander Lerman, MD
Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry
Vice Chairman for Education and Residency Training Director
New York Medical College at Westchester Medical Center
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Behavioral Health Center 3rd floor
Valhalla, New York 10595

  

View Virtual Tour of the Behavioral Health Center


Clinical Services and Rotations

ADULT INPATIENT PSYCHIATRY

While on this service, the resident functions as an integral member of the treatment team. Clinical responsibilities include psychiatric intake, evaluation, management and disposition planning of specifically assigned patients under the close supervision of an attending psychiatrist and psychiatry residents. The resident gains skills in psychiatric examination and evaluation, interviewing techniques, psychopharmacology and is offered some beginning experience in psychotherapeutic techniques.

During the inpatient rotation, PGY-1 residents will also receive weekly off-unit supervision from the Program Director and/or members of the voluntary faculty.

We take training residents as educators very seriously. PGY-1 residents supervise and instruct medical students, and receive guidance and support from senior resident staff. We work to provide useful assessment and feedback to guide residents’ professional development, and to create a learning environment that is constructive, exciting, and physically and emotionally safe.

Most inpatient rotations occur at Westchester Medical Center. We are planning to expand our residency training at MidHudson Regional Hospital.

There are many learning opportunities for residents including lectures and weekly Grand Rounds (September - May). In addition, residents have opportunities to be involved with teaching, including supervising third year medical students, giving lectures, and participating in the education for psychiatry residents and medical students.

PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY ROOM

The resident will participate in the initial evaluation at the emergency room and be a part of the decision of psychiatric admission, including mental status examination, physical examination and review of laboratory data. Residents will learn about legal documents pertaining to voluntary vs. involuntary admission and will also learn how to place the initial orders when a patient is admitted to the floor. This includes psychopharmacology and the level of monitoring (constant observation vs. Q15 minute checks). Residents will also learn about detoxification protocols in the treatment of substance withdrawal.

The resident will also become familiar with clinical steps that are necessary when patients are not admitted and are referred back to the community; this involves, besides the psychiatric evaluation of the patient, contact with the families and friends to gather collateral information and make proper referral for the outpatient follow-up.

ADULT PSYCHIATRIC OUTPATIENT SERVICE

Behavioral Health Center at Westchester Medical Center

Our outpatient service offers a full range of psychiatric treatment options. The adult Outpatient Department (OPD) averages about 11,000-12,000 visits per year, and is staffed by social workers, psychologists, mental health workers, a nurse practitioner, psychiatry attendings, residents and other trainees. Residents may spend three to four hours per week evaluating new patients. Once they have seen the patient, they present the case to a supervisor who then joins the resident in seeing the patient. Interviewing technique, differential diagnosis and treatment planning are discussed. Residents treat adult patients in individual, group and family modalities. Treatment approaches utilized include: supportive psychotherapy, crisis intervention, brief and long-term psychodynamic therapies, combined psychotherapy and medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, group and family therapy, and psychopharmacological treatment. Each resident sees individual patients, co-leads one or two weekly groups, and does one or two weekly intake evaluations. Residents participate in a weekly meeting of all OPD staff to discuss patient evaluations and treatment planning.

The OPD has a broad ethnic mix, reflecting the surrounding community. The predominant patient populations are middle-class, working class, and poor socio-economic groups. Patients have the full-spectrum of psychiatric diagnoses, including adjustment disorders, major depression, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and some cases of dementia. The OPD also treats patients with severe and chronic mental illness, including patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Many of the patients have comorbid medical problems including hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, and HIV. There are specific programs that residents participate in for specific patient populations, ITOP for fragile, chronically mentally ill patients, Gateway for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender patients, and Step-Up for patients with severe personality disorders. Residents have the option of seeing an adolescent patient, and there are a significant number of geriatric patients as well.

ADDICTION PSYCHIATRY

As of July 2016, 8 out of 9 – 10 residents in the PGY-II year rotate in addiction psychiatry at the Montrose VA Hospital, while the remaining 1 – 2 residents per year rotate at our sister campus at the MidHudson Regional Hospital in Poughkeepsie, NY. Residents at both sites engage the complex psychological, psychosocial, and biologic forces behind the pathology and treatment of addiction.

CONSULTATION/LIAISON PSYCHIATRY

The resident is responsible for responding to psychiatric consultations from medical, surgical, critical care, and other services. Duties include psychiatric examination and evaluation of patients, consultation with staff of various medical services and attendance at conferences and rounds. Residents will have the opportunity to work one-on-one with a board certified consultation/liaison psychiatrist.

Residents will have the opportunity to observe psychiatric manifestations of illness in an acute medical setting. Residents will gain knowledge of basic principles of psychosomatic medicine and learn to integrate psychiatric and medical care. Residents will be exposed to a wide variety of cases and will gain clinical reasoning skills in assessing and treating psychiatric components of medical illnesses.

CHILD PSYCHIATRY

The Adult Residency training program benefits from our unusual strengths in Child Psychiatry, including training on a dedicated child psychiatry inpatient unit, adolescent inpatient unit, Child and Adolescent OPD, and a dynamic Child Consultation/Liaison program at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital.

The resident functions as an integral member of a treatment team responsible for specifically assigned children under the close supervision of an attending psychiatrist on a number of child psychiatric services including in- and outpatient facilities. Clinical responsibilities include psychiatric intake and evaluation of children, family studies, medical management, disposition planning and consultation. In order to effectively work with children and their families, the resident will develop an ability to work in teams with other professional staff including teachers, social workers, nurses, psychologists and recreational therapists. The resident gains skills in psychiatric examination and evaluation, interviewing techniques, psychopharmacology and is offered some beginning experience in psychotherapeutic techniques specific to child and adolescent psychiatry.

Residents will experience firsthand the daily role of inpatient and outpatient child psychiatrists. Through patient interactions, residents will have exposure to a wide variety of psychiatric illnesses. Residents will have the opportunity to observe the longitudinal course of chronic psychiatric illnesses and participate in patient treatment from acute management to long term care.

During the elective, residents will have the opportunity to interact with the Director of Child Psychiatry. There are many learning opportunities for students including lectures and weekly Grand Rounds (September-May). Residents have the opportunity to be involved in teaching as well.

GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY

As of July 2016, 8 out of 9 – 10 residents in the PGY-II year rotate in geriatric psychiatry at the Montrose VA Hospital, while the remaining 1 – 2 residents per year rotate at the med-psych geriatrics service at Westchester Medical Center. Residents at both sites engage the complex biological aspects of psychiatric illness and aging.

SCHOLARLY PROJECT REQUIREMENT

A scholarly project is required of all residents. The resident may begin a project during the PGY-II year and must complete this requirement in order to graduate from our program. The scholarly product may be an original clinical research report, a case report, a comprehensive literature review, or a research project. Under the supervision of an attending psychiatrist or research psychologist, residents can participate in either clinical or basic science research in the department, medical school, or pursue their own original research. A research psychologist is available to match residents with projects and assist in data analysis. The scholarly project must be written up, and be of sufficient quality to be either submitted for publication or presented. If not submitted for publication, the project must be presented in Grand Rounds or another appropriate format. All residents present their projects at a Resident Research Forum in June.

Clinical Rotations

There is flexibility about the sequence in which the rotations are taken in the second through fourth years. The rotations are adjusted for those doing a child fellowship after the third year. Each block consists of four weeks; there are 13 blocks each year.

PGY-1

  • Medicine or Medicine/Pediatrics: 4 blocks (WMC)
  • Inpatient Psychiatry: 8 blocks (WMC)
  • Night Float: 1 block (WMC)

PGY-2

  • Inpatient Psychiatry: 2 – 3 blocks (WMC)
  • Emergency Psychiatry: 2 blocks (WMC)
  • Neurology: 2 blocks (WMC)
  • Substance Abuse: 1 ½ blocks (VA or MHRH)
  • Geriatric Psychiatry: 1 ½ block (VA or MHRH)
  • Consultation/Liaison: 2 – 4 blocks (WMC)
  • Child Psychiatry: 1 – 2 blocks (WMC)

PGY-3

  • Outpatient Department: 13 blocks
  • 2 – 6 outpatient psychotherapy patients

PGY-4

  • Senior electives and scholarly project: 6 – 8 blocks
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: 2 blocks
  • Junior administrative attending: 2 – 3 blocks
  • OPD Continuous Cases optional
  • Requirements not met in previous years
  • Interviewing and Psychotherapy Training

At the WMC/BHC program we view the ability to listen to and understand a patient as a core aspect of psychiatry, which underlies all other activities, theoretical frames of reference, or therapeutic modalities a psychiatrist may engage or employ.

Our clinical training emphasizes interviewing and case formulation, including challenging, video-recorded simulated patient interviews. Our outpatient year offers extensive training in both Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Two members of our faculty are faculty members of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Research and Training, and many of our voluntary faculty have distinguished credentials in various treatment modalities.

Third year residents particularly interested in psychodynamic psychiatry have the option of rotating in our Personality Disorders / Development clinical track, as well as participation in the general curriculum. Third and Fourth year residents also have the option of enrolling at the New York Medical College Psychoanalytic Institute.

All residents attend case conferences and didactics focused on treatment of personality disorders, as well as training in Family and Marital Therapy, and Group Psychotherapy.

Simulated Patient Interviews

We have launched an ambitious Simulated Patient Interview Program. Video recordings of the encounters are utilized to build and assess resident skills in challenging clinical scenarios, and as tools in the classroom and clinical workshops.

Care to challenge your clinical skills further? Email WMC Program Director and place the word “SIMULATE!” in the subject line to receive a self-assessment guide based on the interview.

Curriculum and Didactic Education

The psychiatric residency offers a full day of protected academic time, and reflects our commitment to education. (For junior residents assigned to an BHC inpatient rotation, didactics may be spread out through the week, and classes are not scheduled for about six weeks of the academic year). The first-time ABPN passage rate from 2015 to the present is 95%, and our program has launched many residents into prestigious careers around the country.

As you will see from the curriculum below, we augment our in-house teaching staff with voluntary faculty from around the metropolitan area for coursework in subjects ranging from child sexual abuse to cross-cultural practice in the ultraorthodox Jewish community.

We’re always looking for original and inspiring ways to teach: from building models of the brain out of playdough, to rigorous curricula from the American College of Psychopharmacology, to studying the life and writings of Adolph Hitler. Many of our most original ideas come from residents: training residents as teachers is a core part of our educational mission, and many outstanding aspects of our educational program include the work of students-turned scholars in our program.

Research and Scholarship

APA annual conference , SFO, CA, 2019

Under the leadership of our Chairman, Dr. Stephen J. Ferrando, our training program has a dynamic and growing program to foster what we anticipate to be a lifetime commitment to clinical research and scholarship among our trainees. Our initiative includes a regularly scheduled Research Colloquium which serves as an open forum for academic projects in every stage of development, a “Disorder of the Quarter” clinical study and practice review project, and 1:1 faculty support for groups and individual residents engaged in scholarly pursuit.

Psychoanalytic Institute of the Department of Psychiatry

The Psychoanalytic Institute of the Department of Psychiatry at New York Medical College offers comprehensive instruction in psychodynamic psychotherapy. The faculty of the New York Medical College Psychoanalytic Institute provides senior teachers and supervisors to the psychiatric residency training program. Residents can take a two-year course starting in their third year of residency, which leads to Certification in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. Credit for the first year of training in the Psychoanalytic Institute can be given to residents who complete this course. In addition, an elective in psychodynamic psychotherapy is offered to residents as part of the curriculum.

Research and Scholarly Activity 2019-2020

The influence of New York’s SAFE Act on individuals seeking mental health treatment. Psychiatric Quarterly. August 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s11126-020-09816-4
Charder C, Liberatos P, Trobiano M, Dornbush R, Way B, Lerman A.

Comorbidity in Schizophrenia: Conceptual Issues and Clinical Management. Focus, 2020.
Abdullah HM, Hameed A, Hwang M, Ferrando S.

Treating Opioid Use Disorder during COVID-19: A Novel MAT Consultation Service for Inpatient Psychiatric Units
Stephen J. Ferrando, MD; Eldene Towey, MD; Lidia Klepacz, MD; Sean Lynch, BA

COVID-19 Psychosis: A potential new neuropsychiatric condition triggered by novel coronavirus infection and the inflammatory response?
Stephen J. Ferrando, M.D.; Lidia Klepacz, M.D.; Sean Lynch, B.A.; Mohammad Tavakkoli, M.D.; Rhea Dornbush, Ph.D.; Reena Baharani, M.D.; Yvette Smolin, M.D.; Abraham Bartell, M.D.

The Impact of COVID-19 on Opioid-Related Overdoses: A Review of the Literature
Faris Katkhuda, BA; Sean Lynch, BA; Lidia Klepacz, MD

COVID-19 and Clozapine – A Case of Recurrent Infection
Brandon Jacobi, DO; Sean Lynch, BA; Sivan Shahar, BA; Lidia Klepacz, MD; Stephen J. Ferrando, MD

Psychiatric emergencies during the height of the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Suburban New York City Area
Stephen J. Ferrando, MD; Lidia Klepacz, MD; Sean Lynch, BA; Sivan Shahar, BA; Rhea Dornbush, Ph.D., MPH; Abbas Smiley, M.D., Ph.D.; Ivan Miller, M.D.; Mohammad Tavakkoli, M.D., MPH; John Regan, NP; Abraham Bartell, M.D., M.B.A.

Characteristics of calls to a COVID-19 Mental Health Hotline in a New York Pandemic Epicenter
Hussain Abdullah, MBBS; Matthew Garofalo, MD; Sean Lynch, BA; Sivan Shahar, BA; Lidia Klepacz, MD; Rhea Dornbush, PhD; Kenneth Oclatis, PhD; Jaya Save-Mundra, PhD; Alexander Lerman, MD; Stephen J. Ferrando, MD

COVID-19 and Olfactory Hallucinations
Parul Kumar, MD; Lidia Klepacz, MD; Alexander Lerman, MD; Stephen J. Ferrando, MD

Hussain M Abdullah, Vishnuprita Samarendra, ALexander Lerman. Patient Non-disclosure, a clinical perspective. Textbook.

Adam Schein. What makes resident well-being initiatives successful? Addressing burnout in our residency program and others. APA 2020

Gupiteo, K., Daniels C. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia and Post-stroke Psychosis: A Case Report. Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry San Diego, CA November 2019

Hussain M Abdullah, Stephen Ferrando - Poster 4917–Case of hallucinogen persisting perception disorder: Review of potential role of serotonergic system and treatment response

Hussain M Abdullah, Rhea Dornbush, Mitchell Nobler - Poster- Posterior fossa meningioma with cerebellar mass effect presenting as decline in cognitive function and impaired affective modulation: Review of the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. AAGC, 2020.

Michael Diamond, Juan Rivolta, Ahsan Farid, Abraham Bartell - Is it PANDAS something else? A case study of a 12-year-old male with a history of PANDAS, with an alternate diagnoses explaining current symptoms

Anum Khan - Poster 4084 Psychosis or HIV associated encephalitis? An unusual presentation of immune deficiency.

Anum Khan - Poster 4160: Falling through the cracks - suicidality in chronic medical illness.

Anum Khan - Poster 4543: Current practices in the treatment of adult ADHD

Ahsan Farid, Michael Diamond - Barriers to Clozapine use in the United States of America

Mohammad Farooqi, Azeb Hameed - Poster 4483–Creativity: Towards a Network Model

Kinjal Patel - Role of Shame and Survivor’s Guilt in the Development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Following Mass Violence: Case Report and Literature Review. APA 2020.

Vishnupriya Samarendra - Poster 4412 Not Here, Not Now: Understanding and Utilizing Dissociation in Therapy

Vishnupriya Samarendra - Poster 4415 Lying to Myself: Pathological Gambling and its Relationship with Self-Deception

Adil Sarfraz - Poster 4955–What are the methods of assessing emotion regulation? A systematic review

Sarah Vaithilingam - Poster 4430–Clozapine augmentation with perphenazine in a treatment resistant patient

Anna Volkovinska - Poster 4818–Insight development with early treatment adherence and response in first-break psychosis: examining the role of communication in treatment success

Anna Volkovinska - Poster 4896–Acting on imagined threats, love, and superiority: barriers to managing a forensic patient with multiple types of delusions and personality disorders

Muhammad Farooqi, Dania Lerman, Adam Schein, Alexander Lerman. Teaching & assessing interviewing competencies through a simulated patient encounter with a non-disclosing patient. Poster presentation and abstract publication at AADRT 2020 Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX.

Adam Schein, Muhammad Farooqi, Dania Lerman, Alexander Lerman. Gun! A simulated encounter with an armed and agitated patient. Poster presentation and abstract publication at AADRT 2020 Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX.

Bianca-Nandini Jambhekar, Tucker Callahan, Michael Diamond, Mohammad Tavakkoli. Is it the Adderall? A Case Report of Adderall Withdrawal-Induced Dystonia in a Patient with Substance Use Disorder. APA 2020 APA annual conference , SFO, CA, 2019


Current and Past Residents

Chief Residents

Abdullah, Hussain

I graduated from Allama Iqbal Medical College, Pakistan. My interests include studying neurocognitive deficits and mood dysregulation secondary to substance use and utility of non-invasive neuromodulation for their treatment. I will be joining the addiction medicine fellowship class of 2021-2022 at Stanford.

Garofalo, Mathew

I graduated from New York Medical College in Valhalla, NY, and am from Norwalk, CT. My clinical interest is in general adult inpatient psychiatry. In my spare time I enjoy saltwater sportfishing.

Samarendra, Vishnupriya

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Athanasiadi, Argyro

I am originally from Greece and graduated from Democritus University of Thrace. My interests include studies in Personality Disorders and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. I will be applying for CL fellowship. In my free time I enjoy going to the beach and snuggling with my doggie at home!

PGY-I

Amin, Rizwan

I was born and raised in Lahore, Pakistan, where I completed medical school at King Edward Medical University. Growing up in a developing country, with limited access to mental health care, I have seen many individuals suffering from the consequences of untreated mental disorders. Since the very beginning of my medical career I developed a great interest in psychiatry. Later on, every rotation in psychiatry just helped me consolidate my decision to come into psychiatry. At WMC, I have the opportunity to pursue exceptional training where I get exposure to a diverse patient population. So far, I have found that the program is really supportive towards its residents and the administration including chief residents and the program director are easily accessible. In my free time I love cooking, reading fiction, watching sci-fi movies and hanging out with friends.

DeSimone, Daniel

New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine

Elfar, Joseph

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Esela, Andres

I was born and raised in New York City. I studied Philosophy at Vassar College and then completed medical school at New York Medical College. My interests in psychiatry are psychosis, neuropsychiatry and history of medicine.

Fischer, Laura

I am from Chester Springs, Pennsylvania. I studied Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh, received my MPH from Columbia University, and went to medical school at Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Israel. My interests in psychiatry include child and adolescent psychiatry as well as cultural psychiatry.

Greenberg, Maeve

American University of the Caribbean

Khan, Wajiha

State University of New York Upstate Medical University

 

Mahesar, Samina

Peoples University of Medical Health Sciences for Women, Pakistan

Tang, Christopher

Southern California is my home, but I spent most of my childhood growing up in Taiwan. I went to Loma Linda for medical school. My hobbies include basketball, video games, and cooking.

Yoon, Margaret

I am originally from Long Island, NY, and attended NYIT-COM for medical school. I was pre-law during college at Cornell University and pursued a postbac for premedical studies at Columbia. My clinical interests lie in autism research and child psychiatry. In my spare time, I enjoy exercising and traveling. 

   

PGY - II

D’souza, Vanessa

I was born and raised in the Toronto area. I graduated from St. George’s University (Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program). My clinical interests include addiction psychiatry and general psychiatry. I attended culinary school and really enjoy cooking and travelling.

Diamond, Michael

Engaged in OCD and autism research. Enjoys team sports and yoga.

Jacobi, Brandon

I was raised in Westchester, NY, and majored in psychology during my undergraduate studies in SUNY Binghamton. I completed a post-bacc at New York University and went to medical school at TouroCOM in Harlem. My clinical interests include both addiction and general psychiatry. 

Libman, Alexander

Originally from Toronto, I studied biology and then rabbinical studies at Yeshiva University in New York and Jerusalem. I spent my medical school years in Israel, and then took a year off where I did some research, got involved with some meaningful volunteer work, raised a pair of Peking ducks, and spent quality time with my growing family. I’m really enjoying the training program, and I plan to fast track to child adolescent psychiatry

Saperia, Corey

Sackler School of Medicine, Israel 

Sarfraz, Adil

I was born in Walton, NY. I grew up in Buffalo, NY. I studied Biology at SUNY Buffalo, then went to the American University of Antigua (AUA) for medical school. I am interested in adolescent addiction psychiatry. My wife teaches middle school English and Social Studies, and we enjoy finding commonalities between our respective "patients."

Volkovinskaia, Anna

Saba University School of Medicine. I’m originally from Ukraine but grew up in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. In my undergrad I majored in Health and Society, which stimulated my desire to learn about ways to address inequality in our society. After residency, I plan to pursue a fellowship in forensic psychiatry. 

O’Reilly, James

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine

Jacobs, Asaf

Sackler School of Medicine, New York State American Branch, Israel 

Farid, Ahsan

Dow Medical College, Pakistan 

   

PGY-III

Consiglio, Faith

Stony Brook University School of Medicine

Deen, Raafay

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

Farooq, Faiza

I graduated from Dow Medical College, Pakistan. My interests include addiction and role of trauma diathesis in relapse and treatment compliance.  

Farooqi, Muhammad

I graduated from Nishtar Medical University, Pakistan. My areas of interest include "Critical Psychiatry" and philosophical basis for psychiatric nosology. I am also deeply interested in studying depression from different approaches including psychological i.e psychodynamic, behavioral and biological including neuroendocrine and dynamic network models.  

Heller, Ariel

New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine

Jiang, Alice

Medical school: Touro Middletown. Undergraduate education: Duke University. Interests: CL psychiatry, public psychiatry, food, drawing/painting.

Khan, Anum

Allama Iqbal Medical College, Pakistan

Oyemwense, Naomi

Medical School Education: New York Medical College.  Undergraduate Education: Tufts University. 

Ross, Eric

Medical School Education: New York Medical College. 

Schein, Adam

Medical School Education: New York Medical College

Trobiano, Michael

American University of Antigua College of Medicine

 

PGY- VI

Kumar, Parul

Ross University School of Medicine

 

Fellowship Programs of Graduates

2018 Graduates

  • Geriatric Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Westchester Medical Center
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Westchester Medical Center
  • Psychosomatic Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee

2019 Graduates

  • Addiction Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California
  • Addiction Psychiatry, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside School of Medicine – Northwell Health, New York
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Montefiore Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
  • Addiction Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Arizona
  • Psychosomatic Medicine and Psycho-Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York

2020 Graduates

  • Psychosomatic Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside School of Medicine – Northwell Health, New York
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside School of Medicine – Northwell Health, New York
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Boston’s Children Hospital, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire

Faculty

Department Chair:
Ferrando, Stephen J., MD
Chair and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Anderson, Wade Brian, PhD 
Instructor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

Appel, Debra A., MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Baxi, Ami Shreyas, MD
Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Berman, Harvey M., MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Carlson, Stephan M., MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Citrome, Leslie Lucien, MD, MPH
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences


Daniels, Catherine Eva, MD
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Deen, Taj M., MD

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Deltito, Joseph A., MD

Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences


Dombrowski, Frederick B., PhD
Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Donn, Richard, MD
Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Dornbush, Rhea L., PhD, MPH
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Dorsky, Joshua I., MD

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Draoua, Jay D., MD
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences


Duvvi, Vikram Vardhan, MD

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

English, Joseph T., MD
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Sidney E. Frank Distinguished Professorship of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Feminella, Michael, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Gallagher, Richard E., MD
Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences


Gamboa, Martha C., MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Graae, Flemming G., MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Herman, Edward R., MD, JD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Jones, Billye J., LCSW 
Instructor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences


Karampahtsis, Christopher, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Kemker, Susan S., MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Klepacz, Lidia, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Kymissis, Pavlos, MD

Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Larkin, Roland M., PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Laska, Kathy F., MA
Instructor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

Lee, Frances Wen-Hui, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Lefer, Jay, MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences


Leon, Carmen I., MD

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Lerman, Alexander C., MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Lev, Olga, MD
Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Loutsch, Erica M., MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Luther, Charles William, MD
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Mahler, Susan, MSW
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

McCarrick, Richard G., MD, MHA
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences


Nobler, Mitchell S., MD
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Nord, Melissa Ann, Psy.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

O'Connell, Ralph A., MD
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Olarte, Silvia W., MD
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Okan, Hande, MD
Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Ratakonda, Santhi S., MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Schreiber, Klaus W., MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Schultheis, Gary B., MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Shainmark, Steven Scott, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Shaker, Ruth, MSW
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Sissler, Ann M., MSW
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Smolin, Yvette L., MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Stabinsky, Harvey, MD, JD
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Stabinsky, Susan, MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Stern, David Andrew, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Sullivan, Stephen P., MD
Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Tavakkoli, Mohammad, MD, MPH, MSc 
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

Turtz, John Stuart, PhD
Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Yoon, Hiejin, MD
Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Youchah, Joan R., MD
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Zinns, Rachel, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 


Application Requirements

We are pleased to hear of your interest in the Westchester Medical Center / New York Medical College Psychiatry Residency Program.

All applications must go through ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) www.aamc.org/eras. We encourage both allopathic and osteopathic graduates of U.S. medical schools as well as highly qualified international graduates to apply.

Answers to commonly asked questions regarding requirements and our timeline are as follows.

For all applicants:

  • USMLE Step 1, Step 2 CK & CS or COMLEX Level 1, Level 2 CE & PE are required.
  • High scores on these exams (minimum of 205 for USMLE, 480 for COMLEX), with each part taken only once are strongly preferred. Candidates with lower scores may be considered if the rest of their application is very strong, however, those with failures on more than one step will not be considered.
  • A personal statement explaining your interest in psychiatry is very important.  Please do not simply reiterate your accomplishments; let us know something about yourself that is not on the application.
  • Interviews begin in early November and applications should be submitted no later than December 15.
  • Interviews are conducted on Fridays, either 8:45-1:30, or 11:15-4:00, which will be held virtually this year.  Please see www.aamc.org/eras for information about the ERAS application process.

For International Medical Graduates:

  • American psychiatric experience (at least one month, more is preferred), with letters from American physicians, including at least one psychiatrist, is required. Equivalent experience will also be considered (e.g. UK, Canada, some other countries).
  • Research experience is desirable, but not required.
  • Recent graduation from medical school is also preferred (2012 or later).
  • U.S. citizenship, J1 visa status or a Green Card are preferred.
  • Passing Step 3 is desirable.
  • ECFMG certification is required prior to the start of training, but applicants may be interviewed if they have passed Step 1 and Step 2 CK & CS, but have not yet received their certification.
  • Fluency in written and spoken English is essential.
  • We only accept residents through the Main Match of the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP).
  • Our residency is approximately 50% each of international and US graduates.

Residency Contacts


Alexander Lerman, MD

Residency Training Director
Vice Chairman for Education and Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry
Behavioral Health Center, Room N-312
914.493.1863
Alexander.Lerman@WMCHealth.org



Patty Williamson 

Westchester Medical Center Residency Program Coordinator
Behavioral Health Center, N-314
Phone: 914.493.1939
Fax: 914.493.1015
Patty.Williamson@WMCHealth.org

View Virtual Tour of the Behavioral Health Center